Diatonic Major Scale in key of “C”

Overwhelmed by the number of positions from where I can play Diatonic Major Scale. The term “diatonic” refers to the scale which contains the notes of a major scale (no sharps or flats).
Look at following diagram:

Diatonic major in "C"
Diatonic major in “C”

These are the notes that we can play on guitar! As you can see, the complexity of the guitar so high that finding a way of memorizing all these notes is extremely difficult.

So, it is better to divide them in patterns, as seen in following pictures:

3rd Position
3rd Position
5th position
5th position
7th position
7th position
10th Position
10th Position

That’s what I learned in past three days! Playing diatonic major scale from different positions and memorizing the pattern.

Jurassic World

Today I learned is that a block buster movie does not need to be a good movie.

As decided it was time to view this long (read never ending) movie: Jurassic World, in 3D.

This movie is exactly what I expected: great dinosaur special effects and sound with minimal acting of characters and a huge marketing. Chris Pratt and Bryce Dallas Howard in lead role! But putting the milquetoast characters aside, the story is paced nicely and ultimately, the film is exciting.

Despite heavy CGI and other effects the movie is non-challenging and unintelligent. More than anything, “Jurassic World” is not what Jurassic Park was. However, it is simple fun on a lazy Sunday.

Anaglyph 3D
Anaglyph 3D

Tonic in Music

A Tonic is what the beginning and ending note of the diatonic scale. Two parallel can keys have the same tonic. For example, in both C major and C minor, the tonic is C. However, relative keys (two different scales that share a key signature) have different tonics. For example, C major and A minor both have same key signature that feature all pure notes (no sharps or flats), despite having different tonic pitches (C and A).